Changing of the Guard at City Hall

A changing of the guard took place this week at San Jose’s City Hall—literally. San Jose police officer Ted Trujillo was sent back to patrol after overseeing City Hall security the last eight years. His duties included watching the backs of Mayor Chuck Reed for six years and former Mayor Ron Gonzales for two, in addition to making sure any threats to the civic concrete jungle were addressed. To send Trujillo out in style, a virtual who’s who of city officials gathered at Mosaic Restaurant and Lounge last week to swap old stories and casually flirt over beers, cocktails and a catered buffet of calamari, flatbread pizzas and other spruced-up pub grub. Councilmembers Xavier Campos, Pierluigi Oliverio, Ash Kalra and Nancy Pyle, along with Mayors Reed and Gonzales, all made quick appearances before decamping to other functions, while Councilmember Don Rocha, city spokesmen David Vossbrink and David Low, and the mayor’s budget director, Armando Gomez, were among a couple dozen who stayed beyond Fly’s bedtime. Gomez, also a councilman in Milpitas, seemed in especially good spirits near the end of the evening, dropping a couple unexpected I love you, mans. Trujillo, who worked the City Hall beat two years longer than normal, said he’s excited to get back to patrolling the streets and chasing down bad guys—rather than just sitting in meetings with them, perhaps? Meanwhile, his replacement, Brandon Sanchez, who came over from patrol and was shadowing Trujillo at another Mosaic sendoff party a few weeks prior, wore a dark suit and his best Secret Service face to the function. In order to get the City Hall detail, an officer has to apply and pass several tests, similar to detectives in other high-level units. In this case, Police Chief Chris Moore personally signed off on Sanchez’ installment.

The Fly is a weekly column written by San Jose Inside staff that provides a behind-the-scenes look at local politics.

9 Comments

  1. Actually, Bradon Sanchez did not want to do the detail; there was no test among peers, as absolutely no one applied for it. He was given a Hobson’s choice by our lackluster chief… pretty sad… pretty common theme these days

      • Thanks Kathleen. I can’t imagine having to be put in such a position. Makes for a miserable part of the career. I bet he is ecstatic in being “freed”. I wish him well.

      • No I would not. As a matter of fact, I would be ACTING like I was protecting. I certainly wouldn’t be putting my life on the line. It’s called “grin and bear it”.