By the Numbers: Caltrain’s 2040 Vision for Future Growth

Caltrain has announced its $22.1 billion expansion plan for the next 20 years. With the population in Santa Clara County projected to increase by 730,000 from 2010 to 2040, Caltrain aims to upgrade its capacity to serve the growing population in the Bay Area. It plans to rebuild all Caltrain stations and three tracks from San Jose to Gilroy.

By upgrading tracks and straightening curves along the San Francisco-to-Gilroy corridor, Caltrain speed will increase from 79 mph to 110 mph and reduce travel time from 69 to 73 minutes. The longest waiting time at major stations is projected to be 22 minutes. Below is a look at some key data points about the future of Caltrain.

The potential number of daily Caltrain riders by 2040. The population in San Francisco-Gilroy corridor is slated to increase by 40 percent, with 1.2 million people and jobs within two miles of Caltrain by 2040. Projects like the extension of BART to downtown San Jose will also increase the demand for Caltrain.

The amount of planned investments by Caltrain partners, which include major regional projects like the Diridon Station high-speed rail and San Francisco downtown extension to the Salesforce transit center.

The total estimated property value growth within a mile of Caltrain as a result of the upgrades.

Source: Caltrain

Nicholas Chan is a journalist who covers politics, culture and current events in Silicon Valley. Follow him on Twitter at @nicholaschanhk.

3 Comments

  1. > major regional projects like the Diridon Station high-speed rail and San Francisco downtown extension to the Salesforce transit center.

    Wow! Three flops in one sentence:

    1. anything named for Rod Diridon. If it had any worth to society, they would have named it after anybody but Diridon. Maybe even Rich Robinson.
    2. high-speed rail and San Francisco extension: bureaucratic corpses still clinging to the dollars.
    3. Salesforce transit center: Maybe they could offer tours through the homeless poop gardens to see the structural cracks in the unoccupied shopping mall support pillars.

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